Interacting With Disabled People #EndTheAwkward

This post is based on the video I did last year for Scope’s End The Awkward campaign, giving advice about interacting with disabled people. Scope explain things far better than I do – I’m just giving my own perspective on things here – so I strongly suggest looking at their website and videos. But I hope you enjoy my post on the subject as well.

In general you just need be friendly and respectful, and treat each disabled person as a person first and foremost, just like you would with anybody you meet. Don’t make assumptions about how they feel or what they can do, be tactful about any questions you ask so you don’t get too personal, and offer to help instead of forcing it on them. And don’t worry if you do make an innocent mistake. These things happen. Nobody’s perfect, and nobody’s expecting you to be. We do understand if you feel awkward around us – all we want to get across is that you don’t need to feel that way. 🙂

Continue reading “Interacting With Disabled People #EndTheAwkward”

Underground, Overground, Rambling Free

This past week I spent a couple of days in London with a friend. Just a brief visit, but we had a lovely time. It was my first time in the city for a few years – I used to go up there two or three times a year when I was a kid, because we had relatives there, but over the past 5-10 years the visits have been much more sporadic. Hopefully I’ll actually be living there soon (crosses fingers), so this was also a preliminary visit to re-familiarise myself with the area and see what it was like getting around the place.

Continue reading “Underground, Overground, Rambling Free”

Youtube Subtitles

A little while back I wrote a blog post about audio description for TV shows and films, and audio navigation on DVD menus. Things like that really help people who are visually impaired. But if you have partial or complete hearing loss, then that kind of feature isn’t much use. Instead, the equivalent form of assistance for such people is subtitles and captions, which display a text transcript of what people are saying and what sounds can be heard. And these also make a huge difference. And experimenting with it on Youtube has earned me a shoutout on a fellow blogger’s channel, which I’m very flattered about. If you’ve come here because of that video, which I’ll mention later, then hi! 🙂

Continue reading “Youtube Subtitles”

Using RNIB Overdrive

Recently I wrote about audiobooks, including an overview of the RNIB Overdrive service, where you can download books for free from the RNIB’s Talking Book library. It’s a brilliant service with a huge number of titles to choose from, so it’s well worth checking out if you enjoy reading and listening to audiobooks. And in this post, I’m going to illustrate how we use it in my household, so you get a feel for how it works.

Continue reading “Using RNIB Overdrive”

RNIB’s Manor House

At the moment, my mother and I are clearing out and cleaning up the house in preparation to put it on the market. It’s a process which has led to inevitable reminiscing and recollections about the past, one interesting example being a chat we had while I was cleaning the windows recently. It’s a very brief story, but I thought it might be interesting to anyone who remembers the place mentioned in the title.

Continue reading “RNIB’s Manor House”

A Walk In The Park

Today marks the start of this year’s Ten Tors Event, an annual event where young people embark on walking challenges of different lengths on Dartmoor, organised by the Army. You can see it being reported on BBC News and other outlets. For many, it’s a two-day challenge, requiring them to camp out overnight on the moors, while for others with special needs and disabilities there is the Jubilee Challenge, with shorter routes that can be trekked over a single day.

Continue reading “A Walk In The Park”

Audiobooks

I’ve written previously about the importance of music and audio description, so I also want to post about the use of audio for books too. After all, books don’t just have to be printed on paper or displayed on a screen – a huge number of them have audio versions as well. They are particularly useful for visually impaired people of course, but sighted people can (and do) listen to them as well. I don’t personally use them very much – music, TV, films and the internet take up enough of my time where entertainment is concerned – but my mother listens to them a lot, and I do listen to one or two occasionally.

Continue reading “Audiobooks”