Mock The Week – My Studio Audience Experience

This Tuesday I got to be in the audience for the BBC’s Mock The Week, which is recorded at the ITV Studios – go figure! I’ve never been in a TV audience before, so I was looking forward to what I hoped would be an amazing experience. And it was! And it was great to watch it back on BBC2 this evening as well. So I thought I’d tell you a bit about it, without giving away any secrets or spoilers for those who also want to go to the show.

This post isn’t sponsored or endorsed in any way by anyone connected with Mock The Week or SRO Audiences. Nobody’s asked me to do this, I just wanted to relate my experience, as it was very new and exciting for me.

This is also discussed in my video about Being In A TV Audience.

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Aniridia Day – My Shining Success Story

Happy Aniridia Day! 🙂

Today we’re celebrating people’s achievements and ambitions with Aniridia, as part of the Shining Success campaign, for which I edited a promo video I’m very proud of. There are also Facebook and Twitter pages for the day, where people are sharing their stories, photos and videos to mark the occasion, so please do check them out.

It’s already bringing people together with aniridia who have never met before, and helping to spread a positive message of positivity, support, solidarity and hope for the future. And if you want to find aniridia support groups, the links on my Disability Links page may help.

So this post is my contribution for the day, talking about my own achievements and ambitions, as someone living with aniridia. This is also available as a video as well.

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Meeting Elvis at the Museum & Marathon

Being visually impaired, one of the things I’m naturally keen to do is get to know other people with sight loss in London now that I’ve moved here. And I’ve already met a few such people individually, and have plans to meet others, so I’ve made a good start. But in this past week I took another important step by meeting up with a local social group for people with sight loss for the first time.

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Passport Photo Apps

This is a video in which I demonstrate a couple of apps that I’ve used recently to take passport sized photos. I used these to take photos of Mum for a couple of things she needed to apply for – I couldn’t use them on myself, as I can’t see well enough to do a selfie, and there was nobody handy to take a shot of me. So I did use a photo booth for myself, struggling with a monocular to see the screen in there. But for Mum, who is blind, it was worth trying a couple of apps to see what worked.

So the first is Passport Photo, which lets you save an electronic copy of a correctly-sizd photo for sending to someone else or uploading to a website. And the other is Passport & ID Photo, where (for a small fee) the app’s developer will print and cut down the photos and send them back for you. He’ll also check your photo first and, if it’s not quite right, you can have another go at taking them at no extra charge. Both apps worked well and gave us the results we wanted, and in this video you’ll see how they work.

This is not sponsored or endorsed by the app makers, and the opinions expressed are entirely my own. Other passport photo apps are also available, these are just the two I happened to find first. I hope you enjoy it!

 

 

 

Twitter Image Descriptions

This video demonstrates how to activate and use image descriptions on Twitter, from the mobile and desktop sites. These are very important for visually impaired people, as it enables them to understand, enjoy and interact with your content more fully.

More detailed instructions can be found on Twitter’s help page, and I also recommend the videos by Annie Elainey and James Rath explaining the importance of image descriptions.

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All In A Day’s Work

I consider myself to be very fortunate to have retained a steady job for 12 years now. For many (far, far too many) disabled people, gaining employment is way more difficult that it needs to be, and attitudes still need to change in many areas. So I do count myself lucky, and I’ve worked hard to keep my position, by doing jobs promptly and to the best of my abilities, and earning the respect of the colleagues and customers that I interact with. And I do like the work, because of the people I share it with, the variety of tasks that I do each day, and the fact that I’ve learned a lot from it over my time there.

Moving to London, however, led me to assume that I would have to ditch that job and get a new one. Not necessarily easy, given that there are so many people in London also looking for work no doubt, coupled with the fact that I have a disability. But I would at least have a good deal of experience to build on and promote myself with. And maybe there would be better opportunities for training and a higher salary with a London-based job. So I was very prepared to go down that route. If it took a little while to find work, so be it. There would be no harm having a change, so it would be worth the effort. But as it turned out, that was one less thing to worry about.

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Sight Village 2016

Last week I had to go up to London for a couple of days, so I took the opportunity to spend a long afternoon exploring Sight Village, an exhibition showcasing products, services and organisations for visually impaired people. Their main show each year is in Birmingham, but they also have roadshows in Leeds, Edinburgh, Glasgow and, in this case, London. So I thought I’d do a write-up bout my visit. Which, fair warning, is quite long! But I’ve added headings throughout to split it up, in case you want to jump to any part in particular. So I hope you find it interesting. 🙂

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