Scam – Adult Site Blackmail

It’s been quite a while since I last did a scam post, because I very rarely get such emails, thankfully. But this week I’ve received a couple of emails at my work address, both identical, that have grabbed my attention – because they had my real name and a genuine password attached.

So initially, for a few brief seconds, it seemed a little alarming. But then it became immediately apparent that they were fake and not worth responding to. Googling has also shown it to be a very widespread scam that has attempted to extort money out of a lot of people. so at the end of this post I’ll link to an article that deals with it very comprehensively, including responses to concerned people in the comments.

But here I want to discuss the emails I got, by showing you one as an example, and how I knew I could safely delete them.

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June 2018 Favourites

Time for another monthly favourites post and video, this time looking back over June. It was a significant month on social media for a few reasons, plus I also got to see 2 theatre shows, went out to a few museums and did a few walking tours in the nice weather. So there’s plenty to mention.

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My Assistive iPhone Features & Apps

Thank you to everybody for the lovely reactions to my previous post about My Visual Impairment Aids & Gadgets, especially after the RNIB kindly shared it on Facebook and Twitter, where it got a particularly big response. I’m very glad it’s proven so useful, and it’s been great to see other people sharing what they use as a result.

So this post and video is a follow-up to that, looking at the accessibility features and favourite apps I use on my iPhone. I’m not sponsored by anyone to do this or affiliated with any companies mentioned here, I just wanted to share the things that I use and enjoy. So I hope you find this post interesting, and feel free to share the features and apps that you use too.

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My Visual Impairment Aids & Gadgets

I use various things to assist me in my day-to-day life as a visually impaired person, just to make things easier or more accessible. It means I can be independent and do many things that normal people do. So in other words, I’m still leading a normal life, it’s just that I do some things a bit differently to people with regular sight.

Naturally my iPhone is a huge help these days, but I’ll talk about the features and apps I use there in a separate post. In the meantime, you can see a list of my apps here, with an older video about them that I’ll update when I do a new post.

So in this post and video I’m going to tell you about various other aids and gadgets that I use, and a few used by my mother as well, as she’s blind. I’m not affiliated with or sponsored by any companies mentioned here, and these are all my own opinions.

So I hope you find this post interesting. And let me know if there are any particular aids or gadgets that you use a lot, or if there’s anything you recommend I should check out.

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Yoocan Do It

“My impairment’s just a dropped stitch in life’s rich tapestry.
I’m successful, independent, it’s no barrier to me.”

I’m rather proud of that motto, which I came up with this week. It’s adapted from a quote in my favourite sitcom (Only Fools And Horses). Del Boy and Rodney are trapped in a lift, with Rodney understandably distraught about his wife Cassandra’s miscarriage, and Del Boy tells him “it’s just a dropped stitch in life’s tapestry”. It’s a line that’s stuck with me ever since for some reason, I just think it’s lovely.

I created the quote to go with a guest post this week, which has had a massive reaction, way beyond what I could have expected. So I wanted to do a post to explain it and give it a bit of a plug, especially for those who haven’t seen it yet.

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Libby’s Eyes

For the visually impaired and other disabled people, the processes involved in claiming and retaining benefits and support can cause a lot of stress. Some are left feeling that their conditions and needs are not understood by those making the decisions. and by wider society in general for that matter. And there is some truth in that unfortunately. Although awareness is improving, there is still a lot of work to be done.

A new play called Libby’s Eyes is hoping to increase that awareness. It’s written by visually impaired playwright Amy Bethan Evans, and stars visually impaired actress Georgie Morrell as Libby. It’s not often at all that you see a disabled character played by a person with that disability, so that delighted and intrigued me when I heard about the production, as well as the overview of the story itself. So I went to see it on Thursday night with my friend Claire, and I wanted to give you my thoughts on it. Continue reading “Libby’s Eyes”

Aniridia Day – My Aniridia Sight

Happy Aniridia Day! Following the shining success of last year’s launch event, this year it’s back and there’s loads going on today.

For starters, there are hours of live webinars taking place all day, with talks and Q&A sessions by patients, parents, doctors and researchers from all over the world. And I’m involved in one of them, because myself and James Buller will be discussing living with aniridia. So do join us if you can!

But the other major part of the day is the Aniridia Sight campaign, where people post a photo of a scene, and then describe how they see the same scene from the same position – i.e. when they take the place of the camera, what can they see with their own eyes?

So in this post, I’m going to share my contribution to the Aniridia Sight campaign. And you can do the same, by sharing your Aniridia Sight photos and descriptions to the Aniridia Day Facebook group, or posting on social media with hashtag #AniridiaSight and tagging @AniridiaDay. I hope you all have a great day, and you find the following description about my sight interesting.

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