Scam Email – IMF Compensation


It’s time for my first scam awareness post of the new year, pointing out another con I’ve received that promises to give you lots of money that you didn’t know you were entitled to.

There are a lot of variations of this scam – where someone, completely out of the blue and completely unknown to you, is offering to transfer a huge sum of money into your bank account, either for safekeeping or because it’s some kind of reward. They’re always fake.

But this one particularly caught by eye because it tries to sound official by mentioning the International Monetary Fund (IMF), United Nations (UN) and the US Secret Service, But it’s clearly fake. However, there must be people falling for these things if the scammers feel it’s worth sending out. So it’s still worth taking a look to break it down a bit for those who find it useful.

The Email

Screenshot of IMF scam email

From: I M F USA (unations973@yahoo.com)

To: Undisclosed recipients

Reply-To: I M F USA (internationalmonetryfund-usa@usa.com)

Subject: IMF COMPENSATION

Greetings to you.

This is to inform you that the International Monetary Fund [IMF] and the United Nations [UN] is compensating all the scammed victims $330.000.00 United States Dollars.

Your name and email address was mentioned to the United States Secret Service by one of the Scammers who was arrested.

Meanwhile this Compensation department has been mandated by the IMF and the United Nations to transfer your compensation funds to you through Online Transfer Payment which is 100 % Guarantee for payment to you as one of the scammed victim.

Furthermore we advise you to stop any further communication with any other person(s) or office(s) concerning any transaction that you might have lost your hard earned money to avoid losing more money to other group of scammers who are on the FBI wanted list and are still on the run and for this reason we want to warn you not to communicate or duplicate this message to anyone for any reason whatsoever as the United States Secret Service are already on the trace for the other criminals.

You are hereby advised to contact the IMF/UNCC head office to receive your Compensation without further delay on this email address; internationalmonetryfund-usa@usa.com

Anticipating your urgent cooperation in other to receive your payment.

Thank You.

Mr. John William
Communication Secretary,
International Monetary Fund.
USA.

Analysis

As is often the case, this is very easy to pick apart if you use a bit of common sense.

From Address – I M F USA (unations973@yahoo.com)

imf scam from address

Just from this there are a few obvious points to make. Firstly, why is the IMF using an address referring to the United Nations, and why are they using Yahoo Mail of all things? Both the IMF and the UN have their own domains, they don’t need Yahoo.

Furthermore, notice how there are spaces in the From name (and the Reply address below), saying “I M F”, whereas the subject line and email body refer to it as “IMF” without spaces. Quite an odd inconsistency there.

Reply-To Address – I M F USA (internationalmonetryfund-usa@usa.com)

The Reply address of the IMF Scam email - internationalmonetryfund-usa@usa.com. The word monetary in the address is spelt without an a.

Again, this is quite badly mangled as well. Now we have a completely different domain instead of Yahoo. Here’s it’s usa.com – which is just a website offering American location information and has no connection to the IMF or the UN.

On top of that, they’ve also tried to add the full name of the IMF, but have spelt it incorrectly with the word “Monetry” (missing an A). So whoever’s putting this email together isn’t proving to be very smart.

To Address – Undisclosed Recipients

Always a red flag this one. It’s not addressed to me directly – I’m simply on a blind copy list, which means it’s going out to others as well (indeed, it has been posted elsewhere). If it were for me, it would come to me directly. Furthermore, the body of the email would address me by name, but it doesn’t.

Message Text

Although it’s written to try and look official, it’s actually written quite badly (although they can at least spell “Monetary” this time.

Firstly, it isn’t addressed to me, so they don’t know my name. But more than that, it just gets more badly written as it goes on. This paragraph, for instance, is riddled with grammatical oddities:

Meanwhile this Compensation department has been mandated by the IMF and the United Nations to transfer your compensation funds to you through Online Transfer Payment which is 100 % Guarantee for payment to you as one of the scammed victim.

At the very least the last word should be pluralised (“one of the scammed victims”). The word “Guarantee” shouldn’t be capitalised, though they’ve clearly done that for emphasis.

And this paragraph – which is one great big long sentence with no pause for breath:

Furthermore we advise you to stop any further communication with any other person(s) or office(s) concerning any transaction that you might have lost your hard earned money to avoid losing more money to other group of scammers who are on the FBI wanted list and are still on the run and for this reason we want to warn you not to communicate or duplicate this message to anyone for any reason whatsoever as the United States Secret Service are already on the trace for the other criminals.

It’s basically a very awkwardly worded attempt to try and stop you sharing the message with other people. Well, tough, I’m sharing it, here it is.

The next paragraph refers to the “IMF/UNCC head office”, where UNCC is apparently the United Nations Compensation Commission according to Google, but at no point is that stated explicitly in the email. That acronym occurs nowhere else in the message.

You’re also asked to contact the email address with the bad spelling and the wrong domain. And you’re told to reply urgently “in other to receive your payment”, which should be “in order to”.

So the conclusion is obvious – it’s nonsense. As I say, most people reading this will realise that easily without me rambling on about the details. But there are people out there who fall for these things, and my spam posts do get a lot of attention, so I’m only too happy to keep flagging things up. So stay safe, and always be wary of unsolicited emails like this that seem too good to be true.

Author: Glen

Love London, love a laugh, love life. Visually impaired blogger & Youtuber with aniridia & nystagmus, posting about my experiences & adventures.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.